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July 25: 60-second Read from Miracle Man

By on Jul 25, 2014 in Big Pharma, Book Excerpts | 0 comments

For this week’s excerpt of Miracle Man we delve into Bobby’s struggle against big pharma, and his motivation to transform into a true “Miracle Man” by curing diseases that big pharma wished to treat, not cure.   Over the next few months, Bobby immersed himself in researching various diseases and the progress that had been made in science’s efforts to find cures. He was dismayed. Tens of billions of dollars had been spent on research and where were the cures? No major disease had been cured in decades. Research seemed to be fragmented, unfocused and uncoordinated, with much duplication of effort, and researchers going off on their own tangents, distracted by forays into matters of general academic interest. Cure research appeared to be a self-perpetuating industry of its own with no sense of urgency but lots of people making a living from it. And more often than not, the thrust was not to find a cure, but to create a treatment—a product that could be sold. Ongoing treatments with drugs rather than cures seemed to be the focal point. Keep selling those pills day after day rather than eradicate the need for them. Was that cynicism or reality? Bobby didn’t know.     For more, you can purchase the book here. Related: 4 Quotes from “Miracle Man” Robert James Austin that Unmask Big...

July 11: 60-Second Read From “Miracle Man”

By on Jul 11, 2014 in Book Excerpts | 0 comments

In this week’s 60-second read protagonist Robert James Austin’s potential is unveiled during his first official round of IQ testing. His foster parents, Edith and Peter, learn from Dr. John Uhlman just how smart Austin, their little “Miracle Man,” really is:   Uhlman leaned further forward and tapped his desk with his forefinger for emphasis as he spoke. “The results of the exams are nothing short of astounding. Robert is like the Grand Canyon; he’s one-of-a-kind. I don’t believe there has ever been anyone who possesses the magnitude of raw intelligence that Robert has.” “How can that be?” asked Peter as he shook his head from side to side. Uhlman sat back in his chair. “Frankly, we don’t know. There’s no plausible explanation for something like this. The more we study human intelligence, the more we realize how little we know.” “Well, what does that mean in practical terms?” Peter asked. Uhlman handed Peter and Edith a sheet of paper. “Here’s a list of some of the great geniuses in history and their actual tested IQs, or comparative-history determined IQs, based on Catharine Cox’ renown analysis. These are widely accepted in the scientific community as being accurate.” Edith and Peter read the names and the corresponding number:   William Sidis: 300 Johann Von Goethe: 225 Leonardo da Vinci: 225 Kim Ung-Yong: 210 Nathan Leopold: 210 Hypatia: 210 Christopher Langan: 210 Emanuel Swedenborg: 205 Gottfried Leibniz: 205 Francis Galton: 200 Michael Kearney: 200 John Stuart Mill: 200 Hugo Grotius: 200 Thomas Wolsey: 200 Michael Grost: 200 Isaac Newton: 190 Albert Einstein: 180   Uhlman continued, “Now, in comparison, Robert’s IQ is so high that we here at Mayo can’t accurately quantify it, and Drs. Draper, Knoll and Massey reached the same conclusion. And I have to tell you, if you’ll excuse the immodesty, that my staff and I are at the pinnacle of expertise in the field of intelligence measurement.” “Do you have any idea?” asked Peter. “We can only begin to estimate Robert’s minimum intelligence. This we put at 550-600, but I’m confident that this is inordinately minimized. Now in IQ terms, every fifteen points higher is a standard deviation off the mean, which means that a 200 or 300 point differential in IQ between Robert and the highest person on the list, William Siddis, represents not just twice, but a quantum leap in the intelligence level. A veritable different species altogether.” “How could this happen? It just doesn’t make any sense,” Edith said.   For more, you can purchase the book here.   Related: June 27: 60-Second Read From “Miracle Man” ...

What the Face of Big Pharma Truly Looks Like, a Look at Protagonist Colum McAlister

By on Jul 2, 2014 in Big Pharma, Book Excerpts | 0 comments

In the following excerpt of Miracle Man, big pharma is given a human face through antagonist Colum McAlister, CEO of the pharma company Bushings, who rallies his colleagues against the scientific advances of Robert James Austin:   Framed by the library’s imposing fireplace, McAlister spoke as if Obermeir had never uttered a word. “Gentlemen, I love our industry and I know you do too. I’ve given my life to it. I started out as a stock boy at a warehouse loading dock when I was seventeen. And now, Austin is destroying our business. Nobody knows who this guy is or where he came from. Some say he’s a mutant. For all we know, he’s an alien. But who cares? He’s going to cost a million people their jobs and destroy the nest-eggs of tens of millions of our shareholders. If he keeps going on like he has—the only thing left for us to manufacture will be tampons and laxatives. So we have to confront realities. We’ve been entrusted to run our companies and to do what’s best for our shareholders. That’s our job and we’re paid well to do it. Austin’s our competitor and we have to beat him. It’s really no more complicated than that. I hope I have your support.” With the exception of Obermeir, all of the CEOs present agreed that Robert James Austin was the enemy and the enemy had to be stopped.     For more, you can purchase the book here.   Related: June 27: 60-Second Read From Miracle Man...

June 27: 60-Second Read From “Miracle Man”

By on Jun 27, 2014 in Book Excerpts | 0 comments

The following is an excerpt from Miracle Man. Dr. John Uhlman meets a young Robert James Austin, our anti-hero protagonist, for the first time:   Uhlman took some time to just look at Bobby. There he sat, all forty-seven pounds of him, feet dangling in his shiny black dress shoes. A cute but unremarkable looking four and a half year old, whose only distinguishing physical characteristic was his striking eyes. He would blend into any pre-school play-room without difficulty. Uhlman tapped Bobby’s thick file. Could this child really be so unusual or was he just another in the ranks of the top one or two percent of the population that psychologists and educators routinely encounter? Why would this little boy be so special—why should he be? From what Uhlman had read, there was no reason to believe that this child had any extraordinary genetic inheritance. He was likely the progeny of, at best, mediocre genetic material—and very possibly sub-medicore. ‘Nature or nurture?’ What populist rubbish, Uhlman thought. There was no ‘nature’ here and no ‘nurture’ either. Bobby’s parents weren’t brilliant avant-garde educators who had devised a revolutionary learning program starting in the child’s infancy. Edith and Peter were ordinary people who provided nothing more than the average home environment. So what was this child? A genetic mutation –like a two-headed horse or a child born with four arms? Uhlman scratched his head, wondering if he should start getting religious. Leaning forward at his desk, he cradled his chin in the beefy palm of his left hand. There was so little that he and the others really understood. The more he studied and the more research he did, the more he realized how little about human intelligence was known.   For more, you can purchase the book here.   Related: June 20: 60-Second Read From “Miracle...

June 20: 60-Second Read From “Miracle Man”

By on Jun 20, 2014 in Book Excerpts | 0 comments

The following is an excerpt from the prologue of Miracle Man:   He was disgusted with himself and disgusted with her, but they were too young to be burdened. Life was already hard enough. He shook his head incredulously. She had been so damn sexy, funny, full of life. Why the hell couldn’t she leave well enough alone? She should have had some control. He wanted to scream-out down the ugly street, “It’s her fucking fault that I’m in the rain in this crap neighborhood trying to evade the police.” But he knew he hadn’t tried to slow her down either. He kept giving her the drugs and she kept getting kinkier and kinkier and more dependent on him and that’s how he liked it. She was adventurous and creative beyond her years. Freaky and bizarre. He had been enthralled, amazed. The higher she got, the wilder she was. Nothing was out of bounds. Everything was in the game. And so, they went farther and farther out there. Together. With the help of the chemicals. They were co-conspirators, co-sponsors of their mutual dissipation. How far they had traveled without ever leaving their cruddy little city. They were so far ahead of all the other kids. He squinted, and his mind reeled. He tried to remember in what month of their senior year in high school the drugs became more important to her than he was. And in what month did her face start looking so tired, her complexion prefacing the ravages to follow, her breath becoming foul as her teeth and gums deteriorated. And in what month did her need for the drugs outstrip his and her cash resources. He stopped walking and raised his hooded head to the sky so that the rain would pelt him full-on in the face. He was hoping that somehow this would make him feel absolved. It didn’t. He shuddered as he clutched the shiny black bag, the increasingly cold wet wind blowing hard against him. He didn’t even want to try to figure out how many guys she had sex with for the drugs.   For more, you can purchase the book here.   Related: 4 Quotes From “Miracle Man” Robert James Austin That Unmask Big Pharma  ...